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The Lasso

The Student News Site of Santa Rosa Academy

The Lasso

The Student News Site of Santa Rosa Academy

The Lasso

Genetic Engineering is the Future.

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Nora Hutton
A person’s eye looks outward. Close-up shot of eye cloaked in orange lighting.

Understanding and harnessing the ability to alter the human genome may be the key to constructing a better life for our future generations. From eliminating genetic diseases to changing physical features, we can now quite literally change our future.

When you hear the phrase “editing DNA”, it is likely that a mental image of the popular Marvel characters, “Captain America”, or “The Hulk”, comes to mind. The idea that we can customize a species as if from a video game, seems entirely fictional. In reality, it is far from it.

Genetic engineering is defined as the modification of an organism’s DNA. Scientists utilize a tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 to identify areas inside DNA and make changes to them. Technological advances have provided modern-day scientists with the insight and ability to dive deeper into the human species than ever before.

Genetic engineering is one of the most controversial topics of today’s generation. There are many ethical concerns regarding the effects it would have on society. One of the main arguments against the use of genetic engineering is the belief that altering a person’s genetic makeup will produce an alienated species, unnatural, and “non-human”. There is the concern that this may cause such individuals to feel disconnected from their peers, or even themselves. Conversely, there is the concern that the new race of genetically engineered individuals will become a superior group.

Genetic engineering is no different from any other medical intervention; it would not cause a person to be any less “human” than they would otherwise. A multitude of other medical practices also enter an individual’s body, whether that be to alter or to remove something. Although medical practices, such as bone marrow transplants, can reduce the effects of a disease like sickle cell anemia, genetic engineering can provide a permanent fix.

Technology has granted us the knowledge and tools needed to provide lasting relief from harmful genetic diseases; it would be unreasonable not to utilize genetic engineering in the world of medical practices.

There is another argument that the after-effects of genetic engineering will leave us with an elite race of humans. All across time, species have mated to produce offspring that would have the highest chance of survival/success. The ability to customize a human’s genetic composition would not only provide relief from certain diseases but would virtually grant an individual a predisposition for success.

It is common for parents to want their children to have the best future possible and by altering their child’s genes, they can give their child an easier path through life. This can range anywhere from intellectual ability to athletic ability, all of which will provide the individual with a better chance of succeeding.

Scientists have barely scratched the surface when it comes to the human body, and though we harness the power for great change, there is still much to learn. Genetic engineering is an inevitable tool in the world of medicine, and only with time will we be able to witness all of its profound effects.

“We could create a ‘perfect’ generation using genetic engineering, full of healthy children. There are endless possibilities and this is only the beginning.” – Val Aguiniga

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About the Contributor
Sydnee Teo, Staff Writer
Born and raised in the gorgeous Menfiee, California on April 15, 2007, Sydnee Teo loves painting, reading, and weight lifting. Her max deadlift is 250 pounds. Sydnee’s favorite genre of books is dystopian. She enjoys science and wants to be a geneticist or a physicist after attending Stanford University. Sydnee loves many types of music, but her favorite era of music is early 2000’s. The Weekend is one of Sydnee’s favorite artists along with J. Cole; however, she hates Taylor Swift. Sydnee’s favorite flavor of Jolly Ranchers is Cherry, while her least favorite is Grape. 
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